yeevil:

probably not that

(Source: weirdinternet)

lacigreen:

squidsqueen:

What makes me so happy about this is that she isn’t telling you you must love your body or that you are obligated to. She saying you have permission to. And that’s important, because there are a lot of reasons why people have trouble with self-love.  But the idea that you aren’t supposed to love your body, that you aren’t allowed to for whatever reason, needs to be crushed. If you can’t love you body right now, if your body causes you pain or disphoria or distress, you aren’t required to love it. But you are ALLOWED to. You are entitled to the chance to make peace with your body, if you ever reach a point where you are ready to. No one else should be trying to stop you.

beautifully said ^

(Source: beyxnika)

mashable:

Living. The. Dream.

[via]

faineemae:

i’m just saying, take as many selfies as you want.

there are multi-million dollar companies with old white men as ceos that profit off of your low self-esteem and self-hate. 

destroy them.

love yourself.

(Source: faineemae)

siriusuntiltheveryend:

macklesufficient:

six word story about remus lupin:

he went to the funeral alone

image

GO TO YOUR ROOM

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric. He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.
In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric.
He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.

In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.
He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

raygorartshit:

Bisexual Frustration: Everyone is Hot and I’m Really Bad at Handling It - my autobiography


Polyamory is the answer.

raygorartshit:

Bisexual Frustration: Everyone is Hot and I’m Really Bad at Handling It - my autobiography

Polyamory is the answer.

DW +  Rory knows what´s going on

ludicrouscupcake:

poppy-the-knight:

sourcedumal:

I Love My Boo campaign features real young men of color loving each other passionately. Rather than sexualizing gay relationships, this campaign models caring, and highlights the importance of us taking care of each other. Featured throughout New York City, I Love My Boo directly challenges homophobia and encourages all who come across it to critically rethink our notion of love.

GMHC is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected.

this is fucking adorable

SPREAD THESE IMAGES LIKE WILDFIRE PRECISELY BECAUSE THEY FUCK UP THE MISGUIDED STEREOTYPES WE ALL ARE USED TO SEEING.

lacigreen:

both at once pls thank

lacigreen:

both at once pls thank

(Source: your-ass-is-grass-and-ima-mow-it)